Category: Blog

Blog
David Brindle

How can Labour win on social care?

David Brindle will be joining us at Progressive Britain Conference 2024, at our panel ‘Fair Care: Can Labour deliver high quality and accessible care for all?’. Get your tickets to hear more from him there!   How much does Labour need to say about its plans for social care and

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Blog
Alex Hesz

Why are we waiting?

Words, they say, matter in politics. In our social-media hyper-scrutinised age, they matter more than ever. Aha, proclaim the AI-enabled, bot-powered, algo-assembled armies, you said “sustainable” and now you say “lasting”. Gotcha, they cry, you said “nationalisation” then but “public” now. These semantic split hairs are supercharged to the tectonic

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Blog
Frederick Harry Pitts & Andrew Pakes

Securonomics beyond the ‘first political question’: Power, people and place

Rachel Reeves’s recent Mais Lecture set out a powerful framing for Labour’s planned decade of national renewal, adding further detail to what is already being called ‘securonomics’. As Tom Collinge has written for Progressive Britain already, it is rare for front-line politicians to offer such a coherent argument and analysis

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Blog
Tijs Broeke

Banning visa dependents won’t solve the social care crisis

The Government has recently introduced new rules banning social care workers brining visa dependents into the UK. Home Office social media ads proudly declared that the Government has “BANNED overseas care workers from brining dependants.” Adding that “120,000 people who arrived last year would no longer be eligible under our

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Blog
Gary Kent

Ireland and NATO

A senior diplomat once told me in fluent Yes Minister mandarin that countries encouraging the Irish Republic to join the Commonwealth should do so alphabetically. In short, there was little chance of the UK as the old imperial power being heeded. The impetus in the 1990s for Ireland rejoining the

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Blog
Alex Hesz

New Trafford

It is hard to decide which will prove to be the greater crime, in these circles. To acknowledge the singular influence of a justly popular (NB not ‘populist’) Tory, or (and I suspect it is this) to acknowledge the singular influence of a mid-table Premier League club that co-habits a

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